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Past Exhibitions

Shoreline Symphony Exhibition

April 22, 2015 through February 21, 2016

Experience artworks from the Woodson Art Museum’s collection that portray the sights and sounds at the water’s edge. The hypnotic nature of water attracts artists, who observe and skillfully capture an ever-changing landscape while interpreting the rhythmic sounds. Challenge your senses. Hear the sounds, feel the wind, and imagine yourself transported to another place.

Well Drawn: Collection Highlights

Through November 29, 2015

Drawings in pencil, charcoal, and pastel – from finely rendered to loosely sketched – encompass a range of artists’ impressions and offer insight into how artists observe, contemplate, and develop compositions. These two dozen works were created by artists who have been named Masters by the Woodson Art Museum since 1976.

Birds in Art 2015

September 12 – November 29, 2015

Long venerated for embodying freedom, grace, and beauty in flight, birds continually provide creative inspiration to exceed limits of earthbound human existence. As we aspire to sing, soar, and preen like them adorned in brilliant attire, avian art inspires in endless ways. When talented artists from throughout the world strive to be among those chosen for the internationally renowned Birds in Art exhibition, the resulting depictions are breathtaking. The 40th annual Birds in Art exhibition celebrates avian marvels through fresh interpretations in original paintings, sculptures, and graphics created within the last three years. A fully illustrated catalogue accompanies Birds in Art and will be available in September.

The Garden at Night: A Photographic Journey

June 6 – August 30, 2015
Photographs of nocturnal journeys through worldwide botanical gardens, captured by Linda Rutenberg and Roger Leeon using only moonlight and flashlights for illumination, reveal a flourishing, seldom-seen nightlife. The couple’s nighttime photographs, taken at North American botanical gardens, offer fresh perspectives of nature glimpsed while the world slumbers. The Garden at Night has been organized by Linda Rutenberg and is circulated through GuestCurator Traveling Exhibitions.

Bartram’s Boxes Remix

June 6 – August 30, 2015
A collaboration between Philadelphia’s Center for Art in Wood and Bartram’s Garden resulted in unusual and inspired artworks. John Bartram, America’s first botanist, shipped to British clients wooden boxes he filled with seeds, dried plant, and natural history curiosities that transformed the European landscape with colorful specimens from New World gardens. These eighteenth-century seed sales supported his Philadelphia botanic garden and three generations of research. The featured artists “remixed” Bartram’s history, materials, and legacy, using wood salvaged from trees felled by a 2010 storm at Philadelphia’s Bartram’s Garden.

For the Birds: Rare and Extinct

Through July 2015
 
These artworks are a sampling from a collection of more than 350 paintings commissioned for a stamp series highlighting endangered species from around the world to promote awareness and stave off extinction. The entire collection was a gift to the Woodson Art Museum.

Legacy Lost & Saved: Extinct and Endangered Birds of North America

Through July 2015

What lessons can be learned from the demise of the passenger pigeon? Project Passenger Pigeon, a nationwide educational initiative marking the 100th anniversary of the species’ extinction, inspired the Woodson exhibition Legacy Lost & Saved: Extinct and Endangered Birds of North America. Comprising works from the collection and loans, including two Owen Gromme passenger pigeon paintings and sculpture by Todd McGrain, Legacy Lost & Saved features other artists’ portrayals of species such as the great auk and ivory-billed woodpecker. Related programs consider how a brighter future can be shaped by the past.

The Great Marsh: Horicon Waterfowl

Through July 2015

Owen J. Gromme’s lifelong commitment to the restoration of the Horicon Marsh – a vast wetland just west of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, where he grew up – began in the 1920s. Among the largest freshwater cattail marshes in the nation, Horicon sustains an abundance of wildlife and attracts thousands of migratory ducks and geese annually. Artworks depicting waterfowl by Gromme and others, including Frank Benson, Don Henson, Jim Morgan, Sherrie York, and Andrea Rich, comprise The Great Marsh.

Museum Programs Supported by
American Alliance of Museums Accredited Museum
Travel Green Certified

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