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Current Exhibitions

Diverse exhibitions change more often than the seasons as do themes of programs and events developed to enhance visitors’ experiences.

In addition to the flagship, fall Birds in Art exhibition and new exhibitions drawn from its collection, the Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum brings diverse artwork from all over the world in temporary exhibitions, enlivened by visiting artists during artist residencies and programs for all ages.

Also, drop in to experience the sculpture garden, and Art Park – the Museum’s interactive family gallery in the lower level.

Visit often to experience what’s new to see and do.


On View in Temporary Exhibitions

Tiffany Glass: Painting with Color and Light

Posted on November 21, 2016
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December 3, 2016 – February 26, 2017
Tiffany Studios leaded-glass lampshades and windows, designed with colorfully luminous opalescent glass, shine as some of the twentieth century’s most striking, iconic decorative objects.
As a painter, Louis C. Tiffany – son of Charles Lewis Tiffany, founder of luxury retailer Tiffany & Company – was captivated by the interplay of color and light. As his artistic and business interests expanded, Louis Tiffany directed hundreds of Tiffany Studios artists and artisans who created an array of decorative art objects. The use of opalescent glass and innovative techniques, marking a departure from the centuries-old stained glass tradition of painting on the surface of glass, achieved impressionistic effects in Tiffany’s signature leaded-glass work.
Tiffany Glass: Painting with Color and Light was organized by The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass, Queens, New York.

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Enduring Beauty: Art Nouveau Glass

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December 3, 2016 through July 30, 2017

American art glass was greatly influenced by the tenets of Art Nouveau. Between 1890-1910, artists eschewed the elaborate Victorian decoration and repetitious designs of the industrial revolution. Instead, favoring form following function, they used sinuous asymmetrical lines, floral- and plant-inspired decorations, and deep vibrant colors highlighted with metallic iridescence – favrile. Louis Comfort Tiffany, Emil Galle, the Daum Brothers, and others pushed the boundaries, creating beautiful decorative and utilitarian glassware for all to use and enjoy. Enduring Beauty is a survey of works from the collection produced during this nature-inspired era.

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Victorian Art Glass Baskets

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Suffused with cherries, ribbons, flowers, fluting, and frills in vibrant colors ranging from iridescent and opaque to transparent and glittering with silver and gold, art glass baskets are a feast for the eyes. Blown-glass baskets were produced in the United States between 1880 and 1905 encompassing the Victorian era. During this dawn of the Industrial Revolution, an economic boom increased the demand for decorative tableware, and the flamboyant, fanciful designs of art glass suited the eclectic decor of late-Victorian-era homes. This exhibition features a selection of glass baskets collected by Alice Richardson Yawkey, the mother of the Museum’s namesake, Leigh Yawkey Woodson.

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Now on View from the Museum’s Collection

Recent Acquisitions

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On view through February 19, 2017
Art museums by nature are acquisitive. Growing the Woodson Art Museum’s collection remains a core value and ongoing goal. This selection of recently acquired artworks demonstrates the strength of the Woodson’s collection as it strives to set the standard for avian-inspired art.

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Audubon to Wyeth: Paintings, Drawings, and Sculptures

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On view through December 31, 2016

This dazzling, historic array of bird imagery in artworks spanning the early-nineteenth through late-twentieth centuries includes work by John James Audubon, Martin Johnson Heade, Jasper Cropsey, Albert Bierstadt, Frank W. Benson, N.C. Wyeth, and Andrew Wyeth.

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Making Marks

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On view through February 19, 2017

This selection of avian-themed drawings ranges from quick sketches to intricately detailed illustrations, highlighting artists’ varied approaches and the importance of field observation.

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